Jun 192014
 
The confluence of social capital, servant & replicative leadership, and systems.

Social Capital.

Servant leadership ( upside down pyramid being the most apt visual )

Replicative leadership ( Level 4 )

Systems thinking ( a la, Senge, Kiyosaki, Gerber, Woodward, Brady, & others less well known. )

They do intersect, and confluence exists in a metaphorical “river” – this spark that connected them together for me came while reading a page in a remarkable book by H.W. Crocker III.

The author is summing up the Battle of Chancellorsville, talking about Robert E. Lee & Stonewall Jackson and the aftermath of the tragedy which prematurely took the latter General’s life in a ‘friendly fire’ incident on the battlefield.

The quote is powerful :

“People matter, individuals matter; no system, however well-oiled, and no leader, however omnicompetent, can afford to ignore the importance of personnel and having the right people in the right posts.”

So so true. Major league level truth in a matter of a short paragraph!

Mr. Crocker then quotes General Lee …

(speaking to one of the Army of Northern Virginia’s chaplains) “He [ Jackson ] has lost his left arm, but I have lost my right.”

To Lee, Jackson was far more than a subordinate officer. He was supremely trusted to handle the fires of war and the enormous task of leading a tired, under nourished, out-manned & gunned, and strongly individualistic group of men. Clearly, he was the right man in the right post; so to borrow a portion of the quote, “people matter, individuals matter …”

What came to be after this decisive Confederate victory quite likely would have been different if Stonewall Jackson, the “great and good” leader in his own right, had lived. Lee had replicated his impeccable leadership traits, skills, and courage in those within his inner circle – he was by definition, a mentor, a teacher, and a Level 4 leader. Yet, while the system in place within the South’s military was pulling victories from the jaws of defeat and causing President Lincoln much angst and soul searching, the system could not by itself replace Jackson. The personnel mattered too much, empowered as they were to take action and lead from the front.

Think about this. Live it out. Build strong social capital -those wide & deep relationships which are cultivated like that of the farmer in his field. Be the example. Live for those whom you serve. Align your personnel to their strengths, and build an iron clad inner circle. Yet, never lose sight of how valuable one person can be to the whole.

Jan 242013
 
Monthly Movie Recommendation for Eagles & Climbers - VI

Great day to all!

This month’s (and year) kick off movie for those folks in the blogosphere who are, or want, to live intentionally for excellence as an eagle, and climb the summits of their vision and dreams is a very well known multiple Oscar winner from 1995, ‘Braveheart‘.  In my view, this movie was/is a classic of the first magnitude; having a history background, I surely realize that some of the script’s characters, chronology, and scenes were not exactly what happened in the 13th and 14th centuries, however, this should clearly not detract from this film’s amazing upside.

My specific intent with this recommendation is the same as with the other previous blog posts in this ongoing series: To tie this movie into either or both of the fundamentals for LIFE, those being the eight cornerstone, foundational F’s and the thirteen resolutions. Otherwise, as this movie has been reviewed by an army of folks over the past 17+ years, no new ground will be discovered 🙂

William Wallace, the central character and a real life hero, simply defines leadership. There are so many definitions of leadership, however, I’ll point the reader to the one in the early pages of ‘Launching a Leadership Revolution‘ to flag what is one of the very best, if not the best, summation. He had no positional rank in the Middle Ages hierarchy/aristocracy of England/Scotland; he had no official bestowed from on-high title; he was not schooled formally, nor did he ask to lead. In the end game, over the roughly 40 years that the script covers in 3 hours, he simply LEAD. And, his leadership was world class!

Robert the Bruce, another central character, and also a real life hero, defined leadership in a somewhat more circuitous direction. His growth as a man was evident throughout the film:  He realized the value of keeping his word, the definition of courage, how to overcome the handicaps of  positional authority, and the power of words.

The examples and illustration of the resolutions, which incidentally, are simply outgrowths of latter day Western world leaders Ben Franklin, George Washington, & Jonathan Edwards, are in abundance throughout the scenes in this movie. To wit:

Resolution 1, Purpose –  Wallace’s original purpose was to return home, having grown up in his formative years with his uncle’s mentorship, and stay out of the limelight, being a non aristocratic farmer while marrying and raising a family nearby his original home. However, events changed everything for him;  his purpose did nearly a 180, and he was knighted.

Resolution 2, Character – As Wallace grew up in a violent era, where battles fought with crude weapons like spears, axes, and broadswords was the norm, character was definitely earned on a battlefield in most instances. Unquestionably, William’s was!  Coupled with his uncle Argyle’s wise mentorship as he grew into young adulthood, there’s no doubt that Wallace exhibited this resolution to a ‘tee’.

Resolution 3, Attitude – The movie goer will notice that Wallace always brought out the best in his army, and he kept them focused on ever greater heights. He was an encourager & spoke from his heart. The cards he was dealt ( Scots not being allowed to train with weapons, divided clans, et al. ) could’ve led to him being resigned to the English ruling his homeland ad infinitum, however, he listened to his positive voice far more often.

Resolution 4, Vision / Alignment –  What a vision that this great historical leader had!!  He epitomized attaching one’s reality to his/her vision!  He aligned his facts/logical mind (conscious) with his images/metaphorical mind (unconscious/subconscious) like no one else in his era did – and the results were clear to all. A leader’s influence has a strong component of vision, and ending the ‘war‘ between the two sectors of the brain is imperative to have lasting success.

Resolutions 5 & 6 , PDCA’ing / keeping score –  William Wallace surely knew the importance of this combo; he realized that if he did the exact same as his forerunners, he would surely lose as they did, and his vision of a free & independent Scotland would not come to pass. So, he planned ahead how he would defeat the English:  He consolidated the clans together in one common cause; he reached out to the nobility ( Council of Edinburgh ); and he came up with different tactics both for hit & run battles and for the major battlefield encounters. Then, he did what he said he would do, checked the progress, and adjusted as necessary.  He avoided living vicariously through others, he didn’t make excuses and pass the buck when he did come up short, and he knew that the price of winning was always worth it.

Resolution 7 , Friendship – What can be said about Wallace’s inner circle that wasn’t quite obvious by watching the film?  Not all that much. It is beyond clear that he was tight w/ them. He built relationships and bonded w/ Hamish & Stephen, let alone others that were with him through the down times & the up. Sharing agape love with them developed his heart & fortified his will.

Resolution 8 , Finances – Not much focus here, however, while it wasn’t directly mentioned in the script or viewable on screen, Wallace’s leadership and uniting the clans quite likely led to a major hit on Edward I’s treasury!  On a more personal level, Wallace leveraged the power of compounding, he delayed his gratification (i.e., wanting to simply raise crops & build a home nearby where he grew up), & he invested his own capital by putting his country ahead of his personal peace & affluence.

Resolution 9 , Leadership – A true no-brainer. William Wallace = Leadership. ‘Nuff said. He served others at all times; he had a BHAG / huge dream! ; he was a visionary, anchoring the reality of Scotland’s situation to his future vision; and, he brought out the best in people: his inner circle loved him, the clans rallied to him, and like anyone who leads from the front, he polarized.

Resolution 10 , Conflict Resolution – Admittedly, Wallace’s idea of resolving conflict was crude:  Fight & kill them 😉  However, let’s also call a spade a spade:  He did not practice the deadly sins of conflict avoidance, silence, or triangulation either.

Resolution 11 , Systems Thinking / Holism – Thinking in systems is a trait that lacks in so many corners of society; it also did in this era. Wallace, though, was ahead of his English enemies on several fronts related to holistic thought. First, his battle plans were ahead of their time, turning the last few centuries on their head. Second, he understood that if Scotland “had no sense of itself” , his homeland couldn’t be free. It required thinking as a system, getting to the root level to bring warring clans together in a common cause for a higher purpose.

Resolution 12 , Adversity Quotient –  Wallace fit this so very well. He surely experienced a lot of adversity — family wise, growing up in a country with very few freedoms, & seeing friends die on the battlefield. However, like 20th-21st century men & women such as Jack Canfield, Margaret Thatcher, Lou Holtz, & Frank Bettger, his iron will x his emotional intelligence x his intellect ( the latter borne through his growing up with a strong self-directed education ) put him on a level unlike anyone else in his era.

Resolution 13 , Legacy –  Another easy one. When you think of Scotland & even if you know only a little about European history, I’d bet that the name ‘William Wallace‘ isn’t too far from the forefront of your mind. His legacy echoes and ripples to this very day. In fact, once the Scottish Parliament was re-convened, some of the MP’s referred to Wallace as their inspiration! Additionally, Wallace’s amazing leadership helped change the current of decline and statis in Scotland by putting a check on the FLD (‘Five Laws of Decline‘).

In summation, may I conclude that Mel Gibson did an extremely admirable job both in front of , and behind, the camera. His portrayal of Wallace as an actor, and his director role brought out the human qualities of a man that history’s books had not done prior to 1995. I am privilged to be able to offer up my review, and clear recommendation, to this blog’s readership to not only watch this film, but to view it through the filter of resolutions.

May your days ahead be bright, filled with cheer, laughs, & smiles. Nothing but success as you soar like an eagle and climb the mountains to your destiny 🙂

Nov 182012
 
Goodreads

My up to date bookshelves on Goodreads are fully ‘built’  🙂

http://www.goodreads.com/review/list/10209267