Jun 082014
Here Comes The Boom - 2014 Rascal's Guide to + Movies Series - One

Here Comes the Boom‘ was released in late 2012, and I first watched it at a family/friends/fun themed movie night in the summer of 2013.

I can most certainly recommend it. Will this test your advanced knowledge at a credentialist level (PhD or otherwise)? Not in the least. Rather, this movie pulls at heart strings which you may not even know exist. It also will offer a hilarious account of a 40 something public school teacher who pursues something that seems wildly out of the question for someone his age. Its script lays out lessons in chasing dreams, the difference between schooling and education, the building of relationships, how to handle adversity and persevere.

In short, here are some of what I drew from the movie ( which I’ve since purchased & have watched numerous more times )

Schooling v. Education
– Already have learned this, however, this movie further cemented the very large gap between the two.

– Always chase your dreams and never live a settled for life. Case in point was Mr. Voss’ friend who was unhappy as a painter, yet found he was perfectly happy as a chef

– Always be a “balcony person” and not a “basement person” ( see my other blog for a review on the book which taught this so very well: ‘Balcony People’ )

– Resolution 12 is ‘AQ’ ( adversity quotient ). The script embeds this crucial trait in it’s movement of the storyline from a very dis-engaged teacher at the onset to one who refuses to quit even after being nearly defeated near the end.

Friendship & Relationship building
– Always value how important this is. Do not, at any time, rely only on social media/networking.

– Fight for the right reasons. Have a purpose, a cause, and/or a mission to answer the most valuable Q : “Why?”

Example/role model-ing
– Be one in your life. Daily. Don’t attempt to change people; change yourself from the inside -> out, and transform your own thinking & mindset. That is far more powerful and transformational than any other means.

Serving/Giving > Receiving
– Mr. Voss, after starting on the wrong foot, realized that to be what he had to become, he had to give & serve others before thinking of himself. He shoved his ego aside, and put his time into looking after his friend, the music teacher, the kids in the school ( esp. his biology class ), and others.

Success is comprised of failure
– You will see numerous instances of failing in this movie. That is great! Failing is required to be successful.

In sum, definitely give this movie a chance to impact your life as it did mine. Am glad that my life & business mentor chose to share this flick with me last year & am glad to pay forward my review of it in the blogosphere.

* * * * *

One of my favorite clips / scenes :


An excellent source for additional media is found here

Thank you for reading this first post/entry in the 2014 rascal’s movie guide & create your best day ahead!

Aug 112013
What you do MATTERS -- Serve. Pay forward. Give. Bless Others.

Ripples in the still water…

They are caused by something which breaks the stillness; something which serves as the cause, while the effect is palpable to the naked eye …

Who among us, likely while with your parents on a hike, a camping trip, or at a retreat, hasn’t tossed a rock into a pond, a lake, and watched with glee as your act caused something so obvious? ¬†Raising my hand, I am one of them ūüėÄ

So, why would we, as adults, not apply this same principle to your life?

What you do MATTERS.

Here’s the principle I speak of. This is not a new idea, yet I wished to cover it today, as earlier this summer, I was privilved to hear a moving talk from an accomplished business owner ** ( w/ her husband ) who re-told the story that I’ve linked back to at the bottom of this post. The story is a core of the ‘Butterfly Effect’ , and is synonomous with ripples from a smooth stone tossed as a young child. Rather than re-tell that story, let’s use it as inspiration – print it off, and refer to it often …

Let’s apply this to our lives today. Stop spending so much time on obligations that only benefit ourselves and which have limited value to our families, trusted friends, and our society. Our families are the cornerstone of our culture – thus, the butterfly effect, the ripples, matter – and our culture is in dire need of an infusion of leadership that rises from organic growth of our own thinking. Our friends are valuable, so why would we not spend time and effort cultivating those relationships? ¬†That will ripple.

And, social capital can only be rebuilt by conscious focus on restoring values which will bring satisfaction in our business ownership (or our careers/jobs), our faith/spiritual development, our marriages/parenting, and in our time spent community building (anything from the YMCA, PTA, church youth groups/VBS, et al.)

Yes, what you do MATTERS. Focus on priorities! Match your calendar to them at all times. No excuses, please. If you rank something as #1 in your life, it should be #1 on your calendar in terms of the time you spent on it, as often as possible. Sure, urgencies will arise; so long as you remember Covey’s ‘Big Rocks’ vid clip, the visual should stick with you ¬†to guide you back onto the path in case you are knocked off of it.

It is a privilege of mine to serve others, paying forward world class/gold medal information which has the highest potential to lead to the butterfly effect in others’ lives. Help one person/family/entrepreneur fix an issue and grow their servant leadership? ¬†Define their purpose? Sharpen their vision? ¬†Up their adversity quotient? ¬†Fix their finances at the deepest roots? ¬†Those are ripples. They are priorities for those folks, right? ¬†So, the stone and rock tossed is the information, that which, once learned & applied, will effect the change.

How amazing a feeling to shake hands, hugs, fist bumps, and pats on the back with the people whose lives you bless!  Up your count. Give of yourself & pay forward transformational info that has benefited you/your family/your business. And, you will have  your own opportunity to be the Moses, the George W. Carver, the Henry Wallace, and the Norman Borlaug in your own ways.

+ + +

** Thank you so very much, Laurie Woodward, for your ability to inspire through stories! The story that she cited can be found elsewhere; however, here’s a great source that is found easily online >¬†http://lifetoday.org/connect/words-of-life/the-butterfly-effect/ ¬†<

Jun 292013
Earl Nightingale's timeless wisdom ... on criticism

Earl Nightingale was a terrific inspiration to many before my time, however, his wisdom lives on ad infinitum due to the power of the internet, through those who are still alive from his generation, and via various sources of ‘off’line media ( books, audios ).

It is from the middle of these that I heard this information, and it was so valuable, it is forming the fundamental core of this post.

To preface: ¬†Critics are everywhere, most especially when you are doing something that makes him/her/them uncomfortable, something they do not understand (or wish to), or due to some base negative emotion – jealousy, envy, fear, greed, or revenge. ¬†Now, why would you, as someone who is striking out on a journey to do something un-average, something that blesses lives, something that is significant in its impact on your family, friends, culture, or the nation in which you live, ever listen to a critic? ¬† Quite likely, its due to the concept of ‘peer pressure’ — there’s something inside of each of us that wants to drive us to conform, to gain or curry favor from those whom we know, to “fit in” with the crowd. Herein lies the problem at its root; those who do the greatest acts often are criticized, sometimes completely without provocation, with very little merit. Many historical examples spring to mind: Rosa Parks, Gandhi, Lincoln, Washington, Mother Teresa, Jesus Christ, Pythagoras, Mandela, … the list goes on and on.

So, you’re not nearly as well known as those men & women? ¬†Neither were they at one point or many points in their lives. They stepped out. They became public figures. They strived to effect change and be part of the solution(s) to problems. How many critics do you know who have done great and lasting things? ¬†Exactly. I bet you said ‘none’. ¬†ūüôā

Let’s now dive into Mr. Nightingale’s list of nine/9 traits of a critic. ¬†See which one(s) strike the most as you are on your journey; if you are on one, or are considering stepping out from the herd, you’ll quite likely experience one or more of these. Here’s hoping they help you reframe, and re-set your mindset. Never let a critic infilitrate your subsconscious mind- those four billion neurons per second are far too valuable real estate to sell to someone(s) who do not have your best interests at heart, in mind, and in spirit.

— . — . —

No. 1 – A critic only thinks of him/herself.

No. 2 – Critics only talk of themselves.

No. 3 – Critics sulk if people aren’t grateful for what they’ve done.

No. 4 – Critics never forget a service that’s been rendered by them.

No. 5 – A critic expects to be appreciated.

No. 6 – Critics are suspicious of everyone.

No. 7 – Critics are sensitive to slight(s).

No. 8 – Critics are jealous and envious.

No. 9 – Critics don’t trust anyone but themselves.

— . — . —

He also added that these all make a critic’s life miserable, so they tend towards being loveless, and can often be non-providers.

After letting the above sink in, think long, hard, and in depth:  Do you really want someone with even one of these traits helping you make a decision of any size?  Offering you an opinion?

Always positively associate with those who have vision, defined/detected purpose, anchored to their priorities, and whom have your back in all situations.

Hope this helps you. As always, feedback is welcomed & encouraged. Many blessings & well wishes!

Dec 152012
Monthly Movie Recommendation for Eagles & Climbers ‚Äď V

Today‚Äôs blog post is the fifth in a monthly series that I plan to post for the rest of 2012. ¬†I hope all the readers of this blog find as much inspiration, value, & encouragement in these as I intend there to be¬†:) November‚Äôs movie recommendation from the vault for eagles ( those who soar! ) & rascals ( those climbers who strive to be part of the 5-10% riding the success curve of LIFE ) is 1984’s original script by Robert Mark Kamen, which ended up as the film known world wide as ¬† ‚ÄėThe Karate Kid‚Äė.

As this is yet another movie that’s been released well over 20 years ago (28! believe it or not, ’80s fans), there’s not much new I can share about the characters, favorite scenes/lines, or otherwise, however, my specific intent is to tie the script’s premise into the LIFE mantra of the 8 core F’s and/or the MFC‘s 13 resolutions for LIFE. I’d say it goes without saying that Daniel ended up living intentionally for excellence by the time the movie’s credits started rolling! ¬†ūüôā

As with any movie, song, poem, or other medium, it is quite often when one looks below the surface level (“waves”) with his/her thinking that you unearth much more meaning, applicability, and messaging. Oliver DeMille¬†¬†calls this ‘sensus plenior’ , or metaphorical/depth thought. Applying this thinking is so much more powerful and useful when on a journey of leadership growth, personal change, discovery! Daniel’s journey from semi-confident ‘Jersey home anchored teen to emotionally & physically scarred California transplant teen is rather jarring, however, I am quite sure that many in the world, America/West, or elsewhere, have been through something like what he experienced on screen.

Notice how much his life changed for the better once a coach/mentor (and, additionally in his case, a father figure/replacement) entered his life? ¬†Why don’t many more of us listen twice as much and talk twice as less and grow/learn/prosper as he did? ¬† I’d say the root reason is that society/culture teach children -> teens things entirely backwards! ¬† It should be ‘Define’ -> ‘Learn’ -> ‘Do’ ¬†rather than the more commonplace ‘Do’ -> ‘Learn’ -> ‘Define’. What does this excellent teaching movie show us about the 13 resolutions¬†? ¬† Let’s dive in!

Resolution 1 РPurpose:   Daniel, not wanting to leave NJ, had to discover his purpose after being dropped in a very unfamiliar environment.  It took him a while, however, once he did, his life improved immeasurably.

Resolution 2 – Character: ¬†Integrity x Courage. ¬†Mr. Miyagi & Daniel’s mentor-student tag team covered very neatly! The mentor was a man of few words, and high integrity ( the scene with Daniel discovering the old newspaper articles & medals is raw and powerful! ), whereas the student developed the courage to confront his “goliath” over the span of numerous training montages.

Resolution 3 – Attitude: ¬†Daniel’s was in dire need of an overhaul. His mother didn’t discuss the cross country move w/ him, and without his friends, and with no father figure while his mother worked a lot, we see that his self-talk was in the bottom of the barrel. However, as he met, dated, lost, then patched things up with Ali, and became very close to Miyagi, his attitude did an almost full 180!

Resolution 4 – Vision: ¬†When the subconscious mind (‘elephant’) & conscious mind (‘ant’) are not aligned, one’s ability to achieve, to realize goals & dreams, and to have a positive affirmative vision of victory is stifled. Daniel clearly had to work through this during the film, and Miyagi’s calm and cool demeanor, and hidden lessons served as just the tonic that the young teen needed.

Resolutions 5 & 6: ¬†PDCA + Scoreboard‘ing: ¬† Having the plan & do of training for the karate tournament truly served a huge role in the student’s progress towards his mentor’s highest aspirations. The scoreboard of 3 points for a win? ¬†Very clear. Being able to consult with his mentor during the training montages, and later, this tourney? ¬†Allowed the ‘check’ and ‘adjust’ steps to take firm grip and lead to the wins on the scoreboard!

Resolution 7 – Friendship: ¬†Daniel and Miyagi’s relationship during the movie very neatly covered this resolution’s core. It became beyond clear to the viewer during the scene after Daniel obtained his license & stopped over at Miyagi’s for birthday cake ūüôā

Resolution 8 – Finances: ¬† Lucille, Daniel’s single mom, made clear early on that there wasn’t much room in their California budget for karate lessons at a ‘good school’ – and how well that turned out for Daniel!! ¬†It doesn’t take chasing money to get what you want; it takes having positive energy and cultivating your time doing the right things.

Resolution 9 РLeadership:   A leader casts a positive vision, has influence, is purposeful, and serves. Undoubtedly, Mr. Miyagi meets this definition head-on. So very often, the leaders in our lives are those who have no titles, no positions, no credentials, and no press clippings.

Resolution 10 – Conflict Resolution: ¬†If Daniel, let alone his tormentors (Johnny, Tommy, Dutch, Bobby) only knew about the five/5 steps, so much would have been better for the new kid from Jersey at his new high school. ¬†Not to mention Sensei Kreese, who taught violence as an answer well ahead of resolution to one’s issues. Miyagi’s family culture in Okinawa taught this resolution quite well, minus what we later find out in the sequel!

Resolution 11 – Systems Thinking: ¬†Once someone grasps this kind of thinking (a la, Peter Senge, Chris Brady, Ray Kroc, Orrin Woodward, Sam Walton), it changes your perspective on everything. Daniel was able to grasp, after Miyagi’s admonition on the deck, how the “wax on, wax off” , “paint fence, up! down!”, “sand the floor. sand the floor” , & “paint house. Not up, down. Side, Side” connected to karate. It felt, looked, and sounded like just a bunch of hooey until the switch clicked on.

Resolution 12 – Adversity Quotient: ¬†This one undoubtedly applied. As a review, AQ = IQ x EQ x WQ. ¬†Putting aside IQ, as that side of Daniel wasn’t brought out in the script, it was clear that his EQ was in great need of repair, renewal, & insight from a mentor. Mr. Miyagi was clearly a father figure for him, and over the months that passed, with all the training, and friendship, the EQ became whole by the final scene at the tournament. ¬†Lastly, Daniel’s WQ was improved along the road that the young man traveled from his arrival at the California apartment complex to the All Valley Under 18 tournament’s many matches.

Resolution 13 – Legacy: ¬†Legacy cuts across personal, public, and leadership achievements, and is tied to the 8 F’s as well. Daniel’s personal growth under the wing of a wise mentor led to public achievement, and he was able to grow into a Level 2 Leader. His family life, faith, friends, fun, following, & fitness also grew as his legacy was shaped from the opening scenes in NJ to the final music as the credits rolled.


I hope this review resonates, enlightens, and makes the readers think and ponder. All the very best to everyone, and may your life be enriched on your growth journey!


Oct 172012


This is a very interesting short vid.

While pure, unfiltered optimism should always be tempered by having a scoreboard in life (Resolution 6) & a solid understanding of the ‘Stockdale Paradox’, there’s no question that we need to surround ourselves with climbers. Positive association is so very important, and being able to have this kind of perspective, as Mr. Silva describes, is very helpful to counter-act the negativity, cynicism, skepticism, moral fears, & doubt that one runs into often.

Blessings & all best regards!

Jul 252012

Today’s blog post is the first in a monthly series that I plan to post for the rest of 2012. ¬†I hope all the readers of this blog find as much inspiration, value, & encouragement in these as I plan there to be ūüôā

July’s movie recommendation from the vault for eagles ( eagles soar = leaders ) & rascals ( those climbers who strive to be part of the 5-10% riding the success curve of LIFE ) is 2006’s 6th & final movie in the series which in the mid ’70s, ‘Rocky Balboa

There are many other detailed reviews of this inspirational, heart warming, & edifying movie out there online, so my review is limited in scope to discussing how Stallone’s script ties in with growing personally, proactive change, service to others, dreaming big, and turning rejection into energy (fuel from critics & skeptics).

Stallone’s Rocky is in his mid to late 50’s, with the movie set 15+ years after ‘Rocky V‘ & 20+ years after ‘Rocky IV‘ – ¬†it seems clear that there was expectation that Balboa would ever again fight in the ring, show raw courage & determination, or chase down any more dreams. ¬†However, in a chance encounter with a lady, Marie, whom he hadn’t seen since they were kids, her son (Steps), and through his restaurant’s community, his life would end up taking an unexpected turn towards being a leader once again.

While at the restaurant, Paulie, his brother-in-law, came in one night & said that he wanted to watch a “cartoon” fight before going into his job for the night. Turns out, this fight was between Mason ‘the Line’ Dixon, current heavyweight champion, and a younger version of Rocky from his championship prime when Mickey was still alive/his manager. Rocky wins the simulated fight!

This leads to a real fight, a “glorified sparring session/exhibition”, eventually being scheduled in Las Vegas. Before he agreed to do so, his passionate speech to the PA State Athletic Commission + a talk with Marie, convinced him that it was his passion rekindled & his legacy reborn, to get back in the ring one final time.

What does this movie teach us about positive/self growth, personal development, dreaming, & servant leadership? ¬†Plenty! ¬† Let us count the ways …


1. Positive change begins with your own personal example. Rocky modeled this to his son, who had gotten ‘lost’ in the mass media/consumerist world of living for the weekend and not for something greater than oneself.

2. Self growth and personal development do not move in direct proportion to age. As Marie said in a memorable line, ‘The last thing to age on somebody is their heart.’ – ¬†if you change your thinking, you can change your life.

3.  Dreaming big is crucially important and has priceless value regardless of your age, gender, economic background/history, geography, or any other measure.

4. The ‘American way’ and the ‘American dream’ are completely divergent paths. Rocky’s son, Robert, was on the former, and Rocky, having re-discovered his passion, began to again live the latter, as he had in his past.

5. Servant leadership is putting others ahead of yourself, excellence before ego, & service before self. Rocky served his son by challenging him head on with that gold medal talk in the street; he served Marie’s son, Steps, by becoming his mentor; he served Marie by offering her a better life through his job offer to come work for him; he served his customers/community in his restaurant; and, he served Spider by giving back to him years & years after their fight by offering him food and shelter.

In short, without spoiling this excellent movie by saying any more about the plot, script details, or its well rounded characters, I post this blog in the hopes that this movie’s sterling example will inspire even one person in the blogosphere to watch/re-watch it, and be inspired to step out, detect their purpose/passion, build a legacy that outlives him/her, and dreams great dreams.