Nov 182013
 
Knowing your 'Why' = mission = legacy

Why

Missions

Legacy

 

Connecting the dots between such important topics is the hallmark and core of synergistic thinking. Covey spoke about this in the early ’90s via Habit 6, and there are other authors, thinkers, and speakers who also clearly understand the value of this kind of approach to analysis. Names which come to mind: Buckminster Fuller, Peter Senge, Oliver DeMille, & Stephen Palmer.

Additionally, being in the midst of a new ‘great conversation’ adds even more impetus; it’s challenging to resolve deep seated problems while approaching them in ‘silos’.

Being about halfway into the fantastic book, ‘Start With Why‘ , and having heard an audio track of a talk by Mr. DeMille re: uncovering one’s inner genius through the tools (technology) of defining mission(s), led me to better frame the capstone resolution 13 from a world class book which I read in late 2011, ‘Resolved’.  This resolution simply calls for the reader to focus on leaving a legacy.

In a previous post, I delved further into a review of that particular talk by Mr. DeMille; this post ties it together with Mr. Sinek & Mr. Woodwards’ books. Notice how all of these overlap?  Ah, it’s that synergy word!

I challenge the reader and those who blog (if you happen to be both of these, even better!), to think about missions, what his/her ‘why’ truly is, and how defining a legacy, regardless of one’s age, is so very important. Traditional, conventional wisdom encourages day to day, week to week, and at best, quarterly thinking. Reframing this way, will expand the mindset and move you out of your familiar zone

‘What’ you’re doing, and ‘how’ you’re doing it both remain important, however, the ‘why’ makes all the difference.

Knowing what legacy you plan to leave to your friends, family, local community, church/charity, & nation will serve as a major anchor to connect your bow line to, as you move towards realizing your vision and fulfilling your life’s purpose.

Lastly, having a mission(s) gives one something to chase well behind mere money. Passion should precede income at all times. And, there are so many fundamental challenges being discussed in the ‘great conversation’ which can be framed by defining a foundational mission and putting a solutions mindset to work.

It’s been said that leadership is the highest paying profession. All of these are inputs into true leadership – will you rise to the challenge?

Apr 242013
 
'Four Corners' of Friendship

Friendship. So very important, yet so many don’t put a time value on creating, building, and bonding with others in a healthy, win:win friendship: Why is that?

This type of analysis could fill a research paper, let alone an entire book, so this post will necessarily only address at a high level. I am using some content gathered from my own reading & the majority from a seminar that I attended a few months ago where the speakers did a tremendous job weaving together  a tapestry of just what true friendship really is.

First core is to separate the underlying skill set of attractiveness from maintenance. Both of these are learnable, and do not require luck nor talent nor false flattery (or teeth whitener 😀 ) – however, like with so many things in the consumerist, mass media culture, neither are taught all that well.

To Attract —-

Empathy

Responsive listening

Ask lots of questions

Keep good posture / stance & eye contact on the other person

Be likable & build confidence. Trust doesn’t grow overnight.

and …

Edification

Be a ‘good‘ finder at all times

Grace over law ( don’t correct )

Make the other person feel better after having been with you.

—-  —- —

This paves the way so very well for the second core:   To maintain —-

Enthusiasm

Be joyful & use big words to describe how you feel.

Focus on lending others your spirit ( especially if he/she/they are down )

Give ‘happy’

Encourager

Affirm the traits that you previously edified. (i.e., you admire how well the person speaks in front of people she doesn’t know; you think the person is very skilled in cooking steaks on the grill.)

Be a great ‘expect-or’ ( expect the best. Don’t reward mediocrity. )

Talk & share experiences, dreams, goals, & affirmations/resolutions together. Positive association is so very valuable.

—- —– —– —– —-

The talk started to wrap up through the discussion/listing of a terrific selection of books that buttress each of these four  – please feel free to comment on this post if interested in any of the titles:  Am happy to offer up personal testimonials/recommendations for them, as I’ve been blessed to have already read the vast majority of them.

The capstone was the visual of a graph of friendship achievement that looks very much like an exponential curve. In other words, the growth of true, principle based friendship may appear to be completely flat for quite some time, and you may be thinking, “Have I really helped this person know, like, and trust me (as a friend)?”    The answer is:  “Yes!” , and the pay-off, like any solid success or wealth building principle, is going to take some time to show up, but once it does, the reward will return so many blessings to your life.

Then, it becomes your responsibility to pay it forward into another’s life. Friendship isn’t Resolution 7 for nothing – it is central to ever-lasting, purposeful, resolved living.

Mar 102013
 
Do you have the mindset of an innovator & creator?

Innovation & creation. Are they not both building blocks of a growth based, free enterprise economy?

For sure!

So, in that case, we can draw an arrow, without any leap of logic, to what one engine of rebuilding the entrepreneurial mindset of America is and what we need to encourage across all socio-economic classes, whether age, gender, race, ethnicity, or otherwise.

The below information was culled from a fantastic book I read about 15 mos. ago, by none other than leadership expert, John C. Maxwell, ‘Developing the Leader Within You’ 

For any given change proposal, the graphing of the responses looks like this:

2%  – Innovators

10% – early Adopters

60% – middle adopters

20% – late adopters

8% – laggards

I’d say that this is very telling as to why the macro economies of the West have stalled; of course, there is far more to this analysis than just this, however, it’s definitely a piece of the analysis that may not be as well studied as others. Regardless of one’s intent, often, a review will be colored by the person writing it- so if you’re reading an economic study, you may not find out that the person is resistant to change in his/her profession, or generally, so could that’s why, perhaps paired with a lack of reading, we’re not hearing more about this.

When roughly 12% of the population embraces change openly and without time, emotional, or rational resistance acting as ‘sand in the gears’, and 28% on the other side of the teeter totter, could that be why so many look not to entrepreneurs, but to big institutions of yore ( think: big business/corporations, big education, big unions, big government ) or “experts” (many of whom aren’t really experts, lacking their 10,000 hours invested ) to deal with the issues causing economic dis-location, stagnation, and missed growth opportunities?

Let’s change this graphing by addressing the deep roots:  Read more. Listen more (at the expense only of your own thinking that you know the answer(s)). Invest in yourself ahead of all else by cutting needless expenses that have no return on dollars spent. Find mentor(s)) to follow. Join a community based leadership growth group in your area. And, by all means, focus on the great that’s out there – innovate your thinking, and adopt the mindset of an eagle. We have enough chickens and chicken littles 😉